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Cooking Australian Beef

The most popular methods for cooking Australian Beef cuts are Grilling, Broiling, Roasting, Braising, Stewing, Pan-Frying and Stir-Frying. Click on the links below for tips on each cooking method.

Grilling and Broiling are very similar in that food is cooked directly with high heat. But broiling is usually done in an oven with overhead heat, while grilling is done by heating the food from below. Grilling is generally done outdoors, although some modern kitchens include a countertop grill with an exhaust system.

Roasting is a dry heat cooking method often used for large, tender beef cuts.

Braising usually involves searing a whole piece of meat on high heat, then cooking it in a flavorful liquid. Less tender cuts are often prepared this way to produce rich flavor and tender texture.

Stewing is an easy way to prepare a delicious meal in a pot. It usually begins with searing pieces or cubes of meat on high heat. Then add vegetables and other ingredients, cover, and cook at lower heat on the stove top or in the oven until meat is tender.

Pan-Frying (sautéing) uses moderate heat to keep the meat sizzling without burning, creating a flavorful browned crust that seals the natural juices inside.

Stir-Frying is similar to pan-frying except it usually includes vegetables or other ingredients along with the meat. The foundation of a great stir-fry is high heat and strips of meat cut across the grain into even thickness.

Keeping It Tender 

  • Sear meat in small batches, to maintain a dry pan and prevent stewing in the accumulating juices.
  • Don’t turn steaks too often or use heat that’s too low, as meat will stew and toughen without sealing in juices.
  • Use tongs to turn meat; a fork will puncture the meat and allow juices to escape.
  • Test meat by pressing with blunt tongs; cutting with a knife lets juices escape and causes dryness.
  • Allow steaks and roasts to rest a few minutes before slicing, to keep juices inside.

How Do I Know When My Australian Beef is Cooked?  

Australian Beef can be served from rare to well-done, depending on your taste.

Test a steak for doneness by simply prodding the beef with blunt tongs. When it has a springy but firm texture and is moderately juicy, the beef is done. The firmer the feel of the meat, the more well-done it is. Rare will feel very soft, medium will feel a little firmer and well-done will feel very firm.

The best way to determine the doneness of a roast is with a meat thermometer, which can be purchased from most houseware stores. Insert the thermometer at the start of cooking, leaving it in throughout. When the estimated time is up, check the temperature.  

Cook the Perfect Steak

Follow these guidelines for perfectly sublime steak:

        Rare

  • Cook for a few minutes per side, depending on thickness.
  • Turn only once.
  • Cook until steak feels very soft with blunt tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a rare steak as 115–125°F (45–50°C).
  • TIP: Provided you store and handle meat correctly, it is safe to eat whole pieces such as steaks and roasts rare. If bacteria are present, they will occur only on the surface of meat, and are quickly destroyed by the heat of the pan or oven. Sausages, hamburger patties and rolled roasts should be cooked through with no pink meat because the surface meat has been mixed throughout the product

Medium Rare

  • Cook on one side until moisture is just visible on the top surface.
  • Turn only once.
  • Cook on the other side until surface moisture is visible.
  • Steak will be cooked to medium rare when it feels soft with the blunt tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a medium rare steak as 130–140°F (55–60°C).

Medium

  • Cook on one side until moisture is just visible on the top surface.
  • Turn only once.
  • Cook on second side until moisture is visible.
  • Steak will be cooked to medium when it feels springy with blunt tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a medium steak as 140–150°F (60–65°C).

Medium Well

  • Cook on one side until moisture is pooling on top surface.
  • Turn and cook on second side until moisture is pooling on top.
  • Reduce heat slightly and continue to cook until steak feels firm with blunt tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a medium-well steak as 150–160°F (66–69°C).

Well Done

  • Cook on one side until moisture is pooling on top surface.
  • Turn and cook on second side until moisture is pooling on top.
  • Reduce heat slightly and continue to cook until steak feels very firm with blunt tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a well-done steak as 160–170°F (70–75°C).
  • Cook on one side until moisture is pooling on top surface.

How Long to Cook a Roast

 Suggested Roasting Times per pound (500 grams) 

  

Oven Temp

Rare

Medium

Well Done

Beef roast cuts such as Rib, Rib Eye, Tri Tip, Tenderloin and Sirloin

400°F (200°C)

15–20 minutes

20–25 minutes

25–30 minutes